The Other Side of Animation 271: Lost Ollie Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keep the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

As you can tell with The Other Side of Animation, we don’t really talk about live-action films that cross over into the world of animation. The closest we have talked about it is with Cool World, and the only other contender to talk about in this category is Who Framed Roger Rabbit. We don’t get many of these projects because making them work is a challenge and a half. Not only do you need to worry about how the animation looks, but you have to make it match up and feel composited on the live-action footage. That takes way too much time and money that you know studios will want to not invest into that much time and effort unless it’s a well-known director. Not that it never happens anymore, but it’s very rare. When it does happen, it’s worth checking out, and when they are able to deliver on both the impressive technology with a good story, then you know you are in for something truly special. This is where this new limited series by Shannon Tindle comes into play with Lost Ollie on Netflix. 

Created by Shannon Tindle and each of the four episodes directed by the incredible Peter Ramsey, this is based on the book called Ollie’s Odyssey by William Joyce. We follow a small stitched-together bunny doll named Ollie, voiced by Johnathon Groff. He was the toy that belonged to a small boy named Billy, played by Kesler Talbot. He winds up inside a small vintage antique store. He is curious as to why he is no longer with his kid, and plans to escape. While there, he meets an old clown toy named Zozo, voiced by Tim Blake Nelson. The two of them decide to leave the store together and also meet up with a teddy bear that knows Zozo named Rosy, voiced by Mary J Blige. Along the journey they will discover more about what has happened with Ollie and his past with his human owner, and discover what exactly happened with the humans that Ollie knew. 

So, what kind of level of interaction are we looking at here between the toys and the live-action humans? Shockingly, both humans and toys are kept separate for the majority of the time. You see some interactions with Ollie and Billy’s family, but most of the time it’s either the toys on their adventure to find Billy, or dealing with what the humans are going through. There are a few times where it focuses on Billy, his family, and Ollie, but outside of a few areas where the three toys are with humans, like at the hospital, it’s two parallel stories. The human side is more about a very terrible thing Billy and his parents are dealing with, while Ollie is doing his best to remember the locations on the map he stitched together from memories with Billy and his family. It’s a very interesting approach because it lets the toys be their own living characters, while also slowly weaving the story’s emotional beats into the narrative as they intertwine with one another. At the end of the day, the story tackles themes of family, dealing with loss, and how grief can affect you. The story does a fairly solid job showing how people deal with loss, and how it can shape people for better and for worse. The limited series tend to weave in small details on where you can pick up on the intentions and mindset of the characters as you traverse your way through the four episodes. Things take a real sudden shift in tone by the end of the second episode, but by that point, the third episode explains the dynamic between certain characters and what drives them. It can get dark, but if you have seen films like A Monster Calls, then you will feel right at home with how the story unfolds. There is a real humanity to everything, and it makes for a somber, but powerful experience as we follow the journey of both the toys and the humans. 

Now, animation-wise, the toys look great. They follow the rules of their own design of how they maneuver around the world. Sometimes studios aren’t allowed the time or the talent to take the extra step to make the characters all move distinct and different from one another, and it results in everyone feeling the same. Ollie feels different from Zozo, and Zozo feels different from Rosy. Not once was it ever distracting or I felt pulled out of their world or watching their story unfold from their perspective. There is a great sequence on a train that really brings the best out of the voice actors and the animation. It doesn’t hurt that the actors attached to the toys are also great. Tim Blake Nelson is fantastic as Zozo, Jonathan Groff brings a southern innocence to Ollie, and Mary J Blige has this stoic but vulnerable side to Rosy. The humans are also strong with Kesler Talbot being a good child actor and able to bring the somber and anger to certain points. Gina Rodriguez and Jake Johnson are great as the parents to Billy. Now, the southern accent can almost teeter on being a touch much, but it never got to the point where it sounded like a parody of a joke of what a southern accent sounds like. The other actors are fine, and the only real individual I was distracted by was the bully who is just a bit too cartoonishly mean. I wish there was some kind of hint of why he was like that to Billy, but sometimes, we don’t get those answers and some people just have a heart full of hate. 

While it maybe could have used one more episode to help pace out the story a bit and expand a little more on the characters, and how sometimes the southern accent could almost veer into being a little corny sounding, Lost Ollie is a powerhouse journey of the themes of love, grief, dealing with loss, and how you use said emotional baggage to shape your own person. Some may say this limited series is corny, but there is a lot of passion and love put into the character beats, and if you all love stuff like A Monster Calls, then this is an ideal limited series to check out. I can’t wait to see what Shannon Tindle, Peter Ramsey, and this talented crew of writers do next, and you should absolutely check this show out. Hopefully, they can also put this on a nice Blu-ray with some behind-the-scenes features of how they made the animation work as well as it does. Now then, we must journey to Japan for this next review, but you will see what the review is next time!




Rating: Go see it!

The Other Side of Animation 268: Super Giant Robot Brothers Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keep the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

Animation is an ever-evolving medium that we will see growing and changing with how we see artists and tech individuals crafting more experiences. We have definitely seen where some roads to the evolution of animation have taken us from CGI art directions now more able to match the stylish concept art, to that upcoming Fox animated comedy Krapolis for some reason wanting to implement blockchain and NFT nonsense. We have seen animated films use motion capture technology, lower framerates, more stylish visuals, and a mix of both CGI and 2D in varying ways. It’s very cool to be in such a world right now, where we can try something out and see how it works. Maybe it results in something that’s admirable but messy, or something that may have a few clunky aspects but is overall executed well. Who knows, we are seeing anime these days use CGI and motion capture to wonderful success with Beastars, so maybe we can see something like that used for American animation. Oh wait, we have! This is where we are with today’s review, Super Giant Robot Brothers. 




Created by Victor Maldonado and Alfredo Torres, the series is directed by Mark Andrews and is produced by Reel FX Animation. The story revolves around two giant robots named Shiny, voiced by Eric Lopez, and Thunder, voiced by Chris Diamantopoulos, who are made to protect the day from evil kaiju invasions from an unknown alien force that wants to destroy the world. Can our two giant robot brothers be super, and protect the day along with the help of the child science prodigy Alex Rose, voiced by Marisa Davila? What are the origins of these aliens? What do the aliens want? What about the time travel one of the robots went through at the beginning of the show? 




So, what makes this show’s animation style distinct? Essentially, they used motion-capture, but instead of doing the motion-capture data stuff first, and then crafting the models for the motion-capture data, they made assets and models that will be used in the motion-capture process, and they made a production pipeline where the animation is happening in real-time. It’s a little complicated, but luckily, if you go to the Unreal Engine YouTube page, they have a video talking about the process of making Super Giant Robot Brothers. It’s very impressive how they were able to make this work. Of course, they have animators go through the data and give it all of those fancy and polished touches that you expect, since, well, we really don’t need another Ex-Arm situation with motion-capture and animation. Luckily, with what we do have, you can describe the animation as a mix or in the same vein of stuff like City of Ghosts, The Willoughbys, and that upcoming DC-animated DTV film that uses a more stylized CGI look. Despite a few moments where you can tell the motion-capture is there, the show does a great job hiding that aspect. The characters are extremely expressive and their posing gives off so much personality. You got the more child-like movements and expressions, from Shiny to Thunder’s more stoic, robotic, and calculated serious-faced mannerisms. The action also doesn’t get kneecapped by the motion-capture process. It’s still big, explosive, fast-paced, and a thrill to watch. The posing and lower framerate give the character’s movements and motions more of a punch, and you can tell exactly what kind of characters they are by said poses and movements.  Overall, it’s very impressive that this was done on Unreal Engine and a show that is able to use a video game engine. In addition, it doesn’t look like a weird clunky oversea’s animated film or those Unreal Engine demos, where they take a cartoony world and place it in the hyper-realism of Unreal Engine. 



So, is this show all just fancy and impressive motion-capture and action-packed CGI visuals? Of course not! It would be boring if this show was just flashy visuals. There is a story about how our round robot Shiny is teleported into the future and encounters his brother Thunder. The two of them bonding and working with one another is one of the emotional cores of the show, alongside Alex Rose’s journey of finding out what exactly happened to her parents that went through the same portal that Shiny went through. It’s a show that’s mostly about family, bonding, and trust with one another. It’s a show that is basically aimed at a pseudo-young audience, but the writing has enough snap to its dialogue between Shiny and Thunder that older audience members in the teen and adult area will have fun with the action and dialogue. It does balance out its comedy and drama fairly well, as the villains are straightforward, but fun to hear their banter. The voice cast is also solid with the already mentioned Eric Lopez, Chris Diamantopolous, and Marisa Davila, but we also have Delbert Hunt, Ren Hanami, Tiana Camacho, and Tommy Bello Rivas. The opening theme song is great, and it’s a shame they cut it short after the first episode. Theme songs seem to be disappearing all of the time with modern TV, and it would be a real shame for that to be a thing that keeps happening. You need theme songs to hype people up for your show, especially action shows. 

While it’s straightforward and aimed at a pseudo-younger audience, when has that ever actually stopped a show or a film from being good? Some of the most fun things are happening within the animation scene, and despite so much that is going on with Netflix and their situation with the animation industry, the people working in those industries are still going to put out some great stuff. This year alone has given us some really fun series and films, and Super Giant Robot Brothers is one of those. You will definitely feel the power of the Super Giant Robot Brothers, and if you love giant robot stuff whether they be video games, shows, and films, then you should give this show a watch. It’s a fun action-packed comedic romp that is a delight to sit through. Now then, how about we talk about that film that is simply put, one of the best films of 2022? You will have to wait and see what that is! 

Rating: Go See It!

The Other Side of Animation 253: The Cuphead Show Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keeps the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

Heads up: I was able to watch this film via a screener sent to me from Netflix. I got no other form of monetization other than the screener. Thank you Netflix for this opportunity.

Despite the loaded and complicated history of the rubber hose animation aesthetic, the visual look has always been a favorite among fans of art and animation. When animation visual styles go through trends, there is always this yearning for an older visual look, and while I think some of the yearnings for more nostalgic-fueled visuals can sometimes lean into some very toxic attitudes, you can see, on a visual level, why people would want to see creators and studios bring back a classic look to new shows. Of course, when you tackle something with rubber hose animation, it’s the art style you have to be the most careful with, due to how some of the design decisions made during the early days of animation have some racist undertones. Luckily, with Studio MDHR and their hit game Cuphead, they were able to translate the iconic visual style into one of the most graphically impressive experiences of the previous console generation. Of course, when a game like this gets as big as it does, then you know a show is not too far behind. Well, let’s get started then! 

Animated by Lighthouse Studios, executive produced by Chad and Jared Moldenhauer (the two who created the game), and it’s developed by Dave Wasson for Netflix. The two different directors involved for this first batch of episodes are Adam Paloian and Clay Morrow. The story follows the wacky and shenanigan-filled adventures of Cuphead and Mugman, voiced by Tru Valentino and Frank Todaro. They go all around the Inkwell Isle encountering the individuals that live there and of course avoiding the evil grasp of The Devil, voiced by Luke Millington-Drake. Along the way, they interact with their elderly caretaker Elder Kettle,  voiced by Joe Hanna, the lovely Miss Chalice, voiced by Grey Griffin, and you get the idea. 

So, while there was a “plot” in the original game, it was very straightforward. The world was vast and full of a lot of interesting-looking characters. The one thing the game was not, was story-focused. Since that is the case, how on earth do you turn this show into a TV series?  With how there wasn’t too much lore and world-building put into the main game, it wouldn’t make sense to make it more story-driven, so instead of going the route of some story-driven shows, they went the route of the more recent Animaniacs and Looney Tunes direction, making more episodic shenanigan-filled adventures. Some episodes have some pseudo-ongoing story beats, but they are usually wrapped up within the second part, and the first batch of episodes ends with a cliffhanger, so it will be interesting to see where they take the rest of the episodes. The main focus for the episodes is putting Cuphead and Mugman in a situation and the hijinks ensue. They feel very old school with how they set up stories and jokes, but they bring a more modern-day sentimentality to the overall vibe and humor, so it never feels dated or going fully against the time period the show’s animation style is from. A lot of the jokes and set-ups are delightfully charming, and that’s because they were able to give the characters more concrete personalities for our heroes to work off of. Not that the characters didn’t already have them in the game, but they were mostly told through one line of dialogue or through their animation via their movements. Some of the stories have the typical “oh, this was a big misunderstanding” plot set-up or “I’m brave because I got this special item that’s not actually special, but it makes me feel brave”, but the dialogue and the lines they offer are what help elevate it to be more than just shorts going through the motions. With all that said, the character they do give these individuals is delightful, and The Devil might be my favorite character alongside his grunt and King Dice. 

Now then, with the animation, there has been a controversy about how the animation itself is not purely or strickly like the video game. Listen, you can dislike how polished the linework is for the show’s visuals, but the fact of the matter is that doing super old-school 2D animation is costly and time-consuming, and knowing the current landscape of animation production, they were never going to be able to do pure 2D visuals like the old-school days. Heck, the developers of the game revealed they had to remortgage their home to make the game, due to how costly it was to make said game with super slick 2D animation. With what the studio had with whatever production schedule they were given, The Cuphead Show looks really good. It might use a mix of 2D and maybe some animation rigging, but the fact that the visuals look as good as they do and how they were pretty much able to copy and keep the game’s visuals the same is impressive. They even use some filter or graphical techniques to give off the impression of the multi-layer camera effects the older Disney films had. It’s a visually impressive show that stands out from other animated offerings on Netflix. The voice cast is also pretty great, with the already mentioned names above with Tru Valentino, Frank Todaro, Joe Hanna, Luke Millington-Drake, Grey Griffin, Wayne Brady, and the rest of the cast is spot-on with the characters they portray. They even have a few musical moments and they are real bangers that bring back the musical styles of the old Betty Boop cartoons. 

Overall, The Cuphead Show succeeds with its adaptation from video game to animated series, and we already know there are going to be 48 episodes, so we are getting more. Now, Netflix, I’m happy this show is a success, but you better pay the teams that made this show the money they are owed, because with the current landscape of the animation industry revealing how much worse people who work in animation are paid compared to live-action is disheartening and maddening. It would be a shame to find out if you all didn’t give this team their due. Anyway, you can enjoy the first “season” on Netflix on the 18th, and if you like old-school cartoony-style shows, then you will love this show. Now then, let’s tackle a film that Netflix barely covered and advertised with Child of Kamiari Month

Thanks for reading the review! I hope you all enjoyed reading it! If you would like to support my work, make sure to share it out, and if you want to become a Patreon supporter, then you can go to patreon.com/camseyeview. I will see you all next time!

Rating: Go See It!

The Other Side of Animation 205: Kid Cosmic Review

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(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keeps the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

HEADS UP: I was able to review this show early thanks to a screener.

It’s a brand new year, and that means brand new cartoons! It’s always exciting, worrying, and stressful to encounter new shows every year. You don’t know what they might unfold into, but you can also get excited for them because you are traversing into a new world made by creative individuals. I am always pumped when I see a new show from a creator I have been a fan of since I was a kid. It’s fun to watch their careers evolve and what shows they come up with. For example, one of my favorite creators, Craig McCraken, the brains behind some of the best cartoons of the past few decades, has a new show on Netflix called Kid Cosmic!

Created by Craig McCraken, Kid Cosmic is his and his team’s brand new venture into the world of animation that hit Netflix with a cool retro art style, out of this world adventures, and a cat with psychic powers. Anytime a creator I have a lot of respect for comes up with a new cartoon, it’s always worth being pumped for. It’s especially true when you have one heck of a team making the show, and a stellar voice cast. Any show that has a distinct look from the other shows coming out always gets more attention from me. Let’s stop wasting time and jump right in with Kid Cosmic

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Our story plops us right down in the middle of nowhere. I’m assuming somewhere like New Mexico/Nevada desert location. Maybe West Texas if we want to extend it. Our main character is Kid, voiced by Jack Fisher. He lives with his grandfather Papa G, voiced by Keith Ferguson. The kid has a wild imagination that is filled with comic books and sci-fi. He lives with a small group of people that include a teen named Jo, voiced by Amanda C. Miller, a little girl named Rosa, voiced by Lily Rose Silver, and a few others. We also must make sure to include the best character of the show, Tuna Sandwich, a chunky cat voiced by Fred Tatasciore. One night, an alien ship crashes in the mountains near the small town, and a couple of space rocks fall out of the ship. Kid gets his hands on them and finds out that each of the stones has special powers. They include multiplying clones, portals, growing giant, being psychic, and telekinesis. The kid then gets the idea to make a superhero team to protect the town from alien invasions and maybe an unknown force you will meet later on. 

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So, let’s start with this review talking about the animation. This is easily one of the strongest looking visual looks for a cartoon this year. It has a strong retro comic book style that matches the tone from Dennis the Mennis and Richie Rich, and that should be no shock since that is where a lot of the inspiration came from. It looks distinct from many shows that are coming out, and the fact that a still frame of this show looks like it came right out of a comic book illustrates how fantastic this art direction is. I know some may find the limited movements distracting since this is kind of the same style we see in shows like Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts, but for me, it still looks great because of the posing and movements. They aren’t limited, they are more snappy, and each character has distinct movements. This would be a great show to study in an animation class to teach character design and character animation. Each design is so lively, and I just adore the looks of everyone. The aliens, the townsfolks, and the characters we see later on are all memorable. When the action does begin, the animation kicks a lot of tail as it’s wildly creative. 

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The music has a cool underground rock sound to it. The voice cast is also stellar all around. You have your usual quality performances from the likes of Tom Kenny and Keith Ferguson, but I also really enjoyed Fred Tatasciore and Amanda C. Miller. Jack Fisher was also a strong performer when Kid needed to be whimsical, but grounded. I shouldn’t expect anything less from Craig and his team, but they always do a fantastic job at casting their shows. As for the writing, as a comedy, it has some of the typical jokes and gags you would find in this kind of show, but it also has a lot of fun with the different powers and the situations the characters find them in. When Papa G gets the stone that makes him able to clone himself, it leads to some of the most gruesome dark comedy in a cartoon aimed at a kids audience. Quite a few of the jokes have a sharper edge to them that adults will enjoy, but the overall show has a vibe and energy to its writing that anyone can enjoy. I admire that the show does slip in little details and story beats that offer a more substantial story, but even when we get into the second half, you never feel like the story halts in its tracks to stop all of the fun comedy and action just to focus on the story. I like these characters and the fact that they weave story beats into the foreground and background while keeping up the same energy throughout the entire story. They all feel fleshed out and realized. 

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While we might be early in the year, I think Kid Cosmic is a frontrunner for one of the best new cartoons of 2021. It’s full of fantastic humor, incredible designs, vibrant animation, a pitch-perfect cast, and an overall delightful and entertaining experience. It’s a show that hits all of the right notes for me, and I can’t recommend it enough. If you have Netflix and have been craving some new original cartoons, then please watch this show. Well, this was a great show to write a review for, and I can’t wait to see what Craig does next and what a second season will bring. Next time, we will talk about a new film by the director of Long Way North. That’s right, we will be talking about Calamity


Thanks for reading the review! I hope you all enjoyed reading it! If you would like to support my work, make sure to share it out, and if you want to become a Patreon supporter, then you can go to patreon.com/camseyeview. I will see you all next time!



Rating: Criterion/Essentials 

The Other Side of Animation 115: HarmonQuest Review

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Warning/Parental Heads up!: This show does have some profanity in every episode, and some suggestive elements at times. Don’t watch with younger kids. Viewer’s discretion is advised. Hope you enjoy the review!

So, since I review animated films and video games, it should be no surprise that I have dabbled in Dungeons & Dragons/Pathfinders. I’m no master of it, and I only play it when my best friend from Seattle comes to town, but I always love fantasy stuff like that. There is something about making your own character, and having a story unfold with you and your friends’ actions in epic or comedic fashion. Sadly, most shows or entertainment don’t really do a good job at using D&D/Pathfinders in an entertaining way. I know there are popular videos online of lengthy sessions, but the problem is, no one has really found a way to make it both entertaining, and also work in a show-like format. Luckily, we do have such a product. Today’s review will be of the two current seasons of HarmonQuest. Inspired by the HarmonTown podcast tradition of having D&D sessions, HarmonQuest was created by Community creator and Rick & Morty co-creator Dan Harmon and Spencer Crittenden. It’s a half hour, half-live-action and half-animated show. It was originally part of the streaming service Seeso, but due to that service’s failing, the second season is now at home on VRV. So, is it great? Does Dan Harmon have a hit on his hands? Well, let’s get out our character sheets, roll the dice, and find out.

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To be clear, I am reviewing both seasons, so I’m going to be talking about the plot for both. I’ll try my best to keep spoilers out as much as possible. The first season stars a half-orc ranger named Fondue Zoobag, played by Dan Harmon, a goblin rogue named Bone Weevil, voiced by Jeff B. Davis, and a half-elf barbarian named Beor O’Shift, voiced by Erin McGathy. The three are sent on a mission to get back three magical rune stones that are being used by an evil cult to summon the Great Manticore. The second season has our leads trying to stop an evil sorcerer from fusing the demon and the human realms together.

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Let’s start with the positives. I mean, I technically can say that every positive this show has comes with a small negative attached, but in general, I have a lot of praise for this series. For one, this makes the whole concept of Pathfinders and Dungeons & Dragons approachable. Like I said, I’m not the biggest player for this kind of stuff, but due to how the story is kept moving and exciting, it really makes you wonder why more people who dabble in this hobby don’t do this. You are a show, don’t just give us unfiltered bore fests that are four hours long. Of course, the show wouldn’t be getting two seasons if the characters weren’t interesting. Luckily, the show does a great combination of having scripted events and improv comedy. What I mean by this is that they will have situations given to them, but the actors involved don’t have precisely worded scripts, and instead, have to think on their feet. Everyone from the main cast to the special guests work wonderfully off one another, and I don’t remember a current animated show that made me laugh harder than HarmonQuest. Sure, the show has plots and “character moments”, but you watch this show for the interactions of everyone. The first season probably had my favorite interactions, and that’s mostly because, while not every guest has played the game the entire show is based around, their reactions, actions, and lines do work, and no one feels like they are out of place. Season two also does a good job, but unfortunately, I have a few issues with season two, but we will get to that later.

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Since this is an animation review series, and this show is 50% animation, I think for what it is, it holds up, and gets the job done well. I like that every character’s designs are based around the likeness of the actors portraying them (Well, most of the time), and no one feels out of place. I can understand people calling it simple, but for an online series with big names attached to it, it’s not too flashy, but it’s not cheap looking either. You can tell the animators had fun listening to the actors play out the plot and then think, “how we can make this look great, and hilarious at the same time?” The designs are also not confusing. You can tell who is what if you are into this type of game.

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So, it’s time to bring up those negatives I have with the series. Like I said, it comes off as a pro and a con at the same time. While I love the special guests that they get, like Patton Oswalt, Paul F. Tompkins, Paul Scheer, Kumail Nanjiani, Elizabeth Olsen, Jason Mantzoukas, Steve Agee, Thomas Middleditch, and Aubrey Plaza, sometimes, it seems like the guest character doesn’t really have a lot to do in the plot. They are more there to get the plot going than to do much. I felt like this with the episodes that had Aparna Nancherla and Rob Corddry in them. I love the improv between the characters, but the two seasons lack a major story or arcs for the characters. I think that’s partly the compromise with doing the bulk of the story on the spot, but I feel like not a whole lot happens to make the characters grow. Enough happens to give some outlines for the characters, but they are never the focus. And sadly, the comedy doesn’t always land. I don’t think it’s the actors fault, improv is probably one of the single hardest forms of comedy to pull off correctly, but some of the guest role-players don’t mesh well with each other. I was so excited when I saw actors like Patton Oswalt, and Rob Coddry in certain episodes, and while they have maybe a laugh here and there, I found myself liking those episodes less than others.

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In general though, HarmonQuest is one of the funniest animated shows around right now. Sure, it’s not always consistently entertaining, but it’s definitely a show I have watched multiple times, and I don’t do that often. Unfortunately, this isn’t on something like Amazon Prime or Netflix, which is easily the two biggest streaming platforms, but if you want to watch it, you have to get a subscription for VRV. I do hope that it can get a third season, since it ended on a cliffhanger. If you are into anything fantasy, or if any of this sounds appealing, definitely go watch it. Well, that was fun, but next time, we shall dive into Blue Sky Studios once more to check out their latest film, Ferdinand. Thank you for reading this review! I hope you enjoyed it, and I will see everyone next time!

Rating: Go See It!

The Other Side of Animation 57: Rex the Runt Review

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(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com. It would help support my work, and keeps the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

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WARNING/PARENTAL HEADS UP: This series is full of crass adult humor and dry wit. Parental Discretion is advised. I Hope you all like the review!

So, it’s been a little over a year since I started reviewing animated films. I’m feeling proud about that, so I decided to change things up a bit and talk about a TV series. I still plan on reviewing Sherlock Hound, but for now, I’m going to check out a short-lived series by our friends at Aardman. To celebrate their 40th birthday, I decided to write about the obscure series, Rex the Runt. This stop-motion series was directed mostly by Richard Starzak (aka Richard “Golly” Goleszowski) with other directors, including Dan Capozzi, Peter Peake, Christopher Sadler, and Sam Fell. It ran for two seasons from 1998-1999 to 2001, and was on A&E in the states. So, does this show about animated dogs age from back then? Let’s take a look.

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The show revolves around four dogs that live in a house together. You have the lead, Rex, voiced by Andrew Franks in season 1 and Colin Rote in season 2, Bad Bob, voiced by Kevin Wrench in season 1 and Andy Jeffers in season 2, Wendy, the token female voiced by Elisabeth Hadley, and Vince, voiced by Steve Box. The show pretty focuses on them going through creative and surreal British hijinks, while interacting with a quirky cast of characters.

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So, what made this show stand out to me, besides the fact that I barely know anyone who has heard or seen this show? Well, it was one of the few animated shows aimed at adults that dealt with stop-motion. The only other show I can think of that came out around the same time was The PJs. It also had a unique art style to it with the characters all being, for the most part, exaggeratedly flat designs. They even apparently put the characters against a glass sheet in front of the background to help keep that 2D look of the characters in certain sequences. Like most British comedy that I have seen, it’s peculiar and very dry in its execution. However, unlike a lot of British comedy that I have seen, I found a lot of the humor in this show to work. Yeah, you would get a dud of an episode or a few jokes that don’t hit, or to be honest, flew over my head, but I was laughing a lot during the show’s two seasons. The characters themselves are mostly of type, like Wendy is the token girl and Rex is the snarky, quick-witted protagonist, but the two characters of the main leads that stand out are Bad Bob and Vince. As the series went on, I found myself really loving both of these characters the most. Bob is smart, has an eye patch that switches from eye to eye, and carries around a normal-sized revolver, which just happens to look giant compared to him. Vince is the “pet” of the crew, and has a quite frankly hilarious, if underused in season two, disorder called “Random Pavarotti Disease”, where he will spew random opera from his mouth. He also has a habit of speech where he will only say one word or maybe an unfinished sentence for comedic effect. He easily gets the best laughs out of the entire show with how random and wacky he is.

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The animation is solid. For a show with episodes lasting about 10-15 minutes tops, the animation and the style of the characters are still done well. I mean, this is Aardman, so I would be surprised if this was bad animation. It might not be as detailed as Aardman’s bigger projects, but you won’t be distracted by low quality stuff here. The adventures they go on are as well pretty funny, like going to a Home Depot-style gardening center only to be captured by a race of alien plant pots, having to get their house back from an alternate timeline version of themselves, Bob losing weight, traveling into Vince’s head, finding out what is at the center of the earth, and so on. Most of them lead to creative jokes, and are fun to watch.

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However, with all that said, there are a few things you must know about this show. I sometimes felt like the episodes had no focus, or any real urgency to them. It leads to some episodes of the show feeling really boring, or the agency of the situation coming in at the last five or so minutes. The humor, while funny and clever, can be a bit too dry at times. Maybe the jokes flew over my head, or they probably weren’t funny, but some of the jokes were definitely duds. I also found the show to be at times a tad too British for an American viewer, if that makes any sense. I can perfectly see why some people will probably not find this show funny or entertaining. For example, I know the original version of The Office is looked at as a very funny show, I found it to be incredibly boring.

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In the end though, I love Rex the Runt, and I definitely feel like it’s another hit for Aardman. Can I see why it only lasted two seasons? Of course. Can I see why some people might not like the show? Yes. But do I like it? Indeed I do! I even showed it off to a lot of my friends and family friends, and they have great love for the series. You can easily pick up this show on the cheap, and you should check it out when or if you can. Well, now that one year has passed, and I covered my first TV series, it’s time to get back into movies with the promotional prequel film to Final Fantasy XV, Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy. Thanks for reading, I hope you like what you saw, and I will see you next time

Rating: Go see it!