The Other Side of Animation 226: Snotty Boy Review

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(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keeps the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)


Parental Warning/Heads Up: This film is not meant for children and involves an immense amount of crass humor, sex, mentions of Nazis, and scatological elements. If you for some reason want to show this to your kids, you are better off waiting until they are teenagers or older to check this film out. Anyway, here is the review! 


Heads up: I was able to watch this film via a screener sent to me by Picture Tree International. I got no other form of monetization other than the screener. Thank you Picture Tree International.

Animation as a storytelling medium seems to always be in a constant battle to find mass-market appeal. Due to how animation has been treated as a medium only for children or family audiences, there has been a real struggle to tell more adult stories. This is weird since many different countries have been doing so with no struggle. Want to see more adult stories? The Japanese animation industry has plenty. However, that is still not enough to tell Hollywood and the rest of the world that “hey, a lot of adults like animation, and we would like to see adult animation that isn’t the usual stuff we have been getting for two decades now”. Unfortunately, when you think of adult animation, you think of adult comedies full of crass or shock humor, or shows that are hyper-violent and edgy. There seems to be no real happy medium for adult animation to be able to tell diverse stories. It doesn’t help either that no one watches the adult animated films that do go against the norm, and thus fail at the box office or streaming. Anyway, despite my misgivings with the animation fandom and community and how the animation industry seems to disrespect or not want to support more adult animation, I am happy to check out and hopefully enjoy these movies when they do come out. Where do I land with Snotty Boy aka Rotzbub

Directed by Marcus H. Rosenmuller and Santiago Lopez Jover, this CGI film that is a German/Austrian collaboration was released on June 14th and was a competitor in the Annecy 2021 Film Festival. It lost out to My Sunny Maad in the main competition segment and is currently looking for distributors to be released all over the world. So, does this raunchy comedy mixed with a coming-of-age story pull it off and help expand the view of more adult animation? Well, you will have to read the review to find out! 

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Our story revolves around a boy named, well, Snotty Boy, voiced by Markus Freistatter. He lives in a small town in Austria in the 1960s and is going through much of what boys go through with puberty, learning about their sexual urges, love, and dealing with some lingering Nazi sentimentalities. What unfolds is a list of actions including drawing lewd pictures of the woman working at the butcher’s, having his first beer when he’s not supposed to have one, and falling in love with a Romani girl that visits the town. Can he find out who he is before the start of summer and find love while dealing with some garbage individuals? 

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When you look at the trailer for this film, the art style and designs are based on the life of Manfred Deix. It has this weird cartoony visual look that has a more exaggerated Adventures of Tin Tin 2011 look. The texture and human look also remind me of how humans were portrayed in the Shrek franchise. The movements are a touch more cartoony and floaty, which makes the overall execution of the animation look a bit uncanny. They don’t move like humans but have textures and designs that do. The film has a distinct look, but it also has these weird uses of blurring and lighting that make everything look like it was made in an Unreal engine. I like some of the 2D sequences and the overall film at least looks unique in its visual presentation. It might not fully work, but it stands out from other foreign CGI affairs. 

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So, what about the story itself? It has some pretty adult topics like the hateful sentimentality that would be lingering around in the 60s and sadly today, sex, and dealing with being true to who you are if you have a talent, to make sure that talent is nurtured. It’s a lot of things you don’t normally see in adult animation, and it has an entirely different tone and vibe to the story than say, America: The Motion Picture. It’s rather admirable, and while a lot of it is raunchy, shocking, and crass, there is this air of teenage innocence and wonder that this film captures with its grotesque visuals that show off more of the ugly side of going through stuff like puberty. It’s a weird mix that works through a good chunk of the film. It has a low-key vibe at points as you let the main character just chill and go through his thoughts. I even liked some of the villagers in the film. It might be a super crass movie, but I dig how it’s a film that is willing to take its time with the story and characters. 

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With all that said, It is a very crass movie with a lot of sex and poop jokes. It’s a shame because there are some very clever jokes and some of the sex jokes are funny, but I constantly found myself a touch too grossed out at points. I’m not against adult comedies being crude and rude since one of my favorite comedies from 2018 was Blockers, but I have a limit. I also found some characters insufferable, and I know that is the point at certain story junctions, but I did not care for them. I also understand why the characters are designed as they are, but when everyone looks ugly as sin outside of the Romani girl, the lead’s dad, and a few other characters, well, it’s a bit much. 

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I don’t know how much appeal this film has to get fully picked up for widespread distribution, but it’s an interesting watch! I wouldn’t put it in my top 10 of the year, but for adult animation from overseas, I’m happy I got to experience it at all, and I would be interested in seeing who would pick up such a film. I’m sure if push comes to shove, Netflix will probably pick it up. I do think animation fans looking for a more adult experience should give this film a shot if they can find a way to watch it. Hope it finds a US distributor! Anyway, I’m not entirely sure what I’m going to review next. Maybe it will be something from the US. I’m not sure. You will have to check in next time. 






Thanks for reading the review! I hope you all enjoyed reading it! If you would like to support my work, make sure to share it out, and if you want to become a Patreon supporter, then you can go to patreon.com/camseyeview. I will see you all next time!







Rating: Rent It! 

My Journey Through Annecy 2021

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(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keeps the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this Editorial!)

What can I say about the Annecy 2021 Online experience? Well, it was a mixed bag. While I can overall say I had a good time, their move to being both an online and in-person event is what dragged it down for the online customers. Sorry, I don’t have the time or money to spend on going to France during a pandemic. It was a real botched attempt to satisfy the people who could go in person and the people from around the world who wanted to attend. It had some great elements to it, but I would also argue it didn’t do enough for people who wanted to experience it online. Here are my pros and cons of what I took away from the festival 



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Pro: WIP section was fruitful and interesting! 

As with last year, my favorite part of the festival was watching the work-in-progress panels. I loved seeing what films were getting made and how they were tackling the animation process. It’s so cool to get these behind-the-scenes looks at animation production because otherwise, not many people get to see this side of animation. Granted, some of them were in French, so it was a disappointment to watch and not understand parts. A few of them also didn’t seem to have a whole lot done. It made me wonder if these are part “Here is what we are making” and part “We are showing off what we have made so far to look for funding”. That’s not a bad thing, but I think I always want to see films that I can check out sooner than later, but that’s just me. I wish the ones in French all had subtitles or a different making-of video for online viewers so they don’t have to wait to watch them when they are finally dubbed or subbed. 

Favorite Panels: The House, Maya & The Three, Princess Dragon, Little Nicholas, Unicorn Wars, The Peasant, Fena: Pirate Princess, Robin Robin, Perlimps, Nayola.


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Con: None of the feature films were watchable online! 

I think this was the biggest issue, as while it was an issue last year, at least last year’s Online experience let you watch some films that were competing. I know and I get that there is a lot of legal and copyright stuff that kept some of these films out of the online portion of last year’s event, but since some of the films in competition waltzed right in with distributors, like Deer King got picked up by GKIDS and Viva Kids picked up Ape Star, why wouldn’t they be a part of the online part of the festival? I know last year’s batch of watchable films were mostly films with no real widespread value or appeal, but they decided this year that none of them were going to be watchable! I’m sure ya had to be there to see films like Snotty Boy or Mount Fuji Seen From a Train, which didn’t look like an animated film at all! The worst part is that they promised three films were going to be watchable online, but they just never showed up. You could watch the shorts and two old films from 1979 and 1981, but that was it. What is the point of having an online form of the festival when the online viewers can’t watch the features?! It doesn’t help either that Animation is Film 2021 was announced during Annecy, and will (for now) have an in-person and virtual experience with none of the hiccups that Annecy keeps having. Also, Animation First and the NYICFF had films that were fully watchable online! I don’t understand why they are so stingy outside of the obvious legal stuff, but if they aren’t going to have some feature films watchable online in an online version of the festival, then I would rather not participate at all. I was lucky to get a screener for one film, but that was it. Please, Annecy, I beg of you to make the films watchable online for online viewers next time! 

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Pro: Bubble Bath is a trippy film! 

Well, of the two older animated features they had to offer to the online viewers, I was excited to see Bubble Bath. This was a 1979 Hungarian film that had one of the wildest character designs and animation style out of any animated film from back then and even now. It was a film that said, “going off-model is the entire point.” It was also a musical, and while I don’t remember the songs, I thought it was charming! The story was decent enough, but I think the wild visuals and the story got lost within said visuals. Still, it was an experience I rather enjoyed, and once I see it become available in the US, I will buy a copy of the film. 

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Con: A majority of the French Annecy panels did not have subtitles on them! 

Listen, I would love to have all of the time in the world to learn other languages, and I know there are plenty of ways to learn said languages, but when a good chunk of the online viewers are from the US, well, I would just assume not everyone can speak or knows French. They have said the panels will get translated subtitles or dubs, but it makes me wish they did subtitle videos like they did last year. I could generally get what they were talking about, but fully getting it would have made some of them better experiences. 

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Pro: The Inu-Oh Preview. 

One of the highlights was seeing the first five minutes of Masaaki Yuasa’s new film, and boy, was it a ride. With the beautiful animation, the different tone, and the character designs, it’s always exciting to see what Yuasa and his team have come up with next. I’m sad this will be his last film for a while since he’s going to be on break, but if the rest of the film was as good as these first five minutes, then I can’t wait to see how the rest of the film unfolds.

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Con: Should have had more previews! 

I loved the Inu-Oh preview and admired the unknown horrors we will be stepping into with Space Jam: A New Legacy, but those were the only two? You couldn’t do previews of the films that were being shown off or upcoming films? What about the ones that were premiering there as screenings like Luck Favors Nikuko? I don’t know, it reeks of the online consumers not having a proper experience, while the in-person stuff got all of the love and support. 

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Pro: The Panels were a lifesaver

Seeing the Netflix, Ron’s Gone Wrong, and other informational animation panels were a nice addition to the Work-in-Progress panels. Being able to see new shows and upcoming films for services like Netflix was fun! 

Favorite Panels: The Netflix ones and Ron’s Gone Wrong

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Con: There needed to be more for the online attendees than just the shorts

Let’s be really frank here, the online viewers got the short end of the stick. The shorts were great! The panels were great! However, that was it. Again, I get that they wanted to focus on the in-person event, but if you aren’t going to offer an equal experience to the online filmgoers, then maybe don’t do an online experience. I still enjoyed my time at Annecy, but I want Annecy to do better. I want to talk about more of these films that everyone might want to know about, but when you don’t give me access to them, well, I don’t know if I can get the word out and maybe drum up some attention.

Thanks for reading the review! I hope you all enjoyed reading it! If you would like to support my work, make sure to share it out, and if you want to become a Patreon supporter, then you can go to patreon.com/camseyeview. I will see you all next time!