The Other Side of Animation 276: Drifting Home Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keep the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

Studio Colorido has been a rather surprising animation studio that has put out an eclectic resume of work. From short films and net animations, to working on major properties like Pokemon, they have put their name down as a quality animation studio. Even their film releases have mostly been good. Granted, I prefer Penguin Highway over A Whisker Away, but not every film is going to be a home run for studios. Every animation studio in Japan’s animation industry is going to have a dud and a hit and it’s never going to be 100% consistent. Still, a studio like MAPPA, Science Saru, and Colorido has the clout to make an announcement and you make sure you see it, because they are crafting journeys like Drifting Home for Netflix, and it’s a real gem you should all check out. 

Directed by Hiroyasu Ishida, the film is co-written by Ishida, Hayashi Mori, and Minaka Sakamoto. It stars a group of six kids. They are Kosuke Kumagai, dubbed by Bryce Papenbrook, Natsume Touchi, dubbed by Cassandra Morris, Taishi Koiwai, dubbed by Alex Cazares, Yuzuru Tachibana, dubbed by Ben Diskin, Reina Hama, dubbed by Abby Trott, and Juri Ando, dubbed by Cherami Leigh. As they venture around an old abandoned apartment building that is soon to be torn down, they all end up getting caught in a shift in scenery and location as the apartment building they are on is swiftly sent into the ocean along with them. As they try to find out the situation and what to do about it exactly, they also encounter a boy who may or may not be a ghost named Noppo, dubbed by Elliot Fletcher. Can our group of kids find a way back home while discovering what their friendship and/or relationships mean to one another? 

Do you know those old 80s/90s kids’ films that didn’t do well, but became cult classics and beloved childhood favorites? This is a modern-day take on those types of movies where a bunch of kids are the main focus, and we follow them through their journey on a metaphorical and literal memory of a giant building. A majority of the film is the kids traversing the open sea and checking out other buildings that are floating in the water, looking for food and reminiscing about the relationship each other shares. Now, while this film is at two hours, there are multiple points where they show montages of the kids interacting with one another and growing as individuals. It’s a coming-of-age story about kids who encounter themes of found family, loss, and memories first, and then an adventure film second. Sure, some characters show more growth than others, but the ones that get the focus make sense. It’s an intensely touching story that, while stumbling in how it handles its drama in the third act with how repetitive it gets, when it hits the right emotional note, it can be a real punch into the emotions. What this review is saying is that Its heart is in the right place. 




The film’s animation is more or less what you would and should expect from the talented artists at Colorido. They have always had a knack for having more expressive characters than most studios are willing or able to go the distance with how emotional the characters are on screen. It’s a studio with a distinct style, which is needed nowadays in order to stand out. Still, the combination of character animation, lush colors, beautiful backgrounds, and how it’s able to mix in 2D and CGI with relative ease makes this a gorgeous movie to look at. It takes its time to have moments where you can feel enthralled in the environment around our leads, and absorb the emotional headspace they are in when the story calls for them to have some kind of revelation or epiphany about what exactly is going on with them. It doesn’t hurt either that the cast is great. As mentioned above, you have a fantastic English dub cast of Bryce Papenbrook, Cassandra Lee Morris, Elliot Fletcher, Benjamin Diskin, Abby Trott, Cherami Leigh, and a surprise appearance of John DiMaggio, which is surreal. Not that it’s weird to see DiMaggio in anime dubs because he used to dub a lot of anime back in the day, but to see him again after so long being in mostly US-based animation is just great. Returning from composing the music from Penguin Highway is composer Umitaro Abe, and he brings a magical and adventurous vibe to the soundtrack. I mean, when you are a group of kids that are going across the high seas on a giant building, well, it should be fun and fanciful. 





While a touch too unevenly paced at two hours, Drifting Home is a charming journey a ton of kids take through memories about family, friendship, and dealing with loss and change. It could have balanced out its drama better, but it’s still a compelling and enjoyable ride with Studio Colorido’s distinct and colorful animation style, while also including a cast of likable child characters and a complex story about found family and caring for one another. It might not be as good as the director’s previous film Penguin Highway, but Drifting Home is a stellar experience that anyone looking for good Japanese-animated films to watch should absolutely check out. Now then, next time we will be looking at yet another Netflix exclusive, so be on the lookout for what it is! 

Rating: Go See It!

The Other Side of Animation 273: Bee and Puppycat Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keep the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

2022 in TV animation has been underwhelming. With 2020 and 2021 giving us great and unusual shows that sound like disasters, but are not. With 2022, well, there’s Vox Machina, Super Giant Robot Brothers, The Cuphead Show, and that’s about it. There should always be this push to have more original shows that help keep the creative landscape of animation alive, since IP-driven projects and continued seasons of already existing shows can’t be the only thing that keeps the landscape of animation vital. You need to be able to stand out from the pack and not be just a variation of something else that exists. You need to be something like today’s show and review, Bee and Puppycat on Netflix. 

Based on the original shorts by Natasha Allegri, which were then rebooted into the version you see on Netflix, this show is chiefly directed by Joji Shimura, created by Natasha Allegri, and produced by Oriental Light and Magic aka OLM Inc. We follow our lead Bee, voiced by Allyn Rachel, a young woman who lives on an island and works at a cat cafe. One day, after some shenanigans that result in her getting fired, she encounters an unusual puffy cat thing known as Puppycat. While wondering where her next paycheck is going to come from, Puppycat warps her to a place where she can get a multitude of temporary work gigs that will take Bee and Puppycat across the universe and into the possible hands of some unknown entities that are looking for our heroes. 

With it being 2022, we have now had a good 12 years of how cartoons of this current era have been handled. Instead of having thicker outlines and sharper corners, we have thinner outlines and rounder designs. What has helped make these shows stand out is how abstract and unusual they are. Instead of having one genre or one type of set-in-stone story, they cross the streams and become genreless due to how they are a multitude of different genres. Some are more adventure-focused ala Adventure Time, some have more of a dash of sci-fi to them like Steven Universe, and some had more references or vibes of an 80s cartoon like The Fungies. They also tend to have a more modern and low-key tone and humor to them. Even when things get zanier, the humor is still more universal or has a quirky side to it all. The point I am trying to make is that after more than a decade of shows like Amphibia, Infinity Train, The Owl House, Steven Universe, Adventure Time, Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts, and so on, you have to do well to stand out from the rest. So, what does Bee and Puppycat do that differentiates them from the pack? Have you ever dived into the deep end of the indie game scene? Do you know those indie games that have an art direction that’s more akin to modern cartoons and have lo-fi beats, and are usually more story-driven ventures? Or maybe they are visual novel-like experiences? This is kind of like that but in a more concentrated form. Everything here is so lo-fi and chill that even down to the voice performances, everything is relaxing and soothing. It has its moments where things get twisted and dark, but even then, the music doesn’t change to anything intense or extreme with its execution. Even when the show is showing you rather mature or shocking moments and plot twists, you will still feel as though you were wrapped up in a cozy blanket with a hot cup of tea on a cold winter morning. It’s honestly refreshing. Even when the shows get grander in scale and stakes are now cataclysmic, the show never feels like it changes all that much. 

Another aspect of this show that’s really surprising is that, despite its cute visual look, there is a lot of cursing. So, yeah, this isn’t a show that’s really aimed at kids. They only bleep out some of the curse words, but they will be there out in the open. If your children aren’t bothered by that, then the rest of the show’s tone and the journey will feel similar to most modern cartoons.Maybe it’s because this individual didn’t watch the original shorts, but seeing what looked like another fun family show turn out to be more for teens and young adults was a pleasant surprise. It honestly results in this being another great example of an adult animated show that doesn’t try to be like Family Guy or South Park. It’s a show that tackles themes of depression, love, dealing with loss, grief, relationships, abandonment, the challenge of change, and dealing with lingering unkempt emotional baggage. It’s always the most innocent-looking cartoons that decide to scar you with intensely emotionally-driven themes and trauma. However, that is what is fun about shows like this. They aren’t just goofy characters in a goofy setting and hitting the reset button after every episode. The people in this show are diverse and have different personalities and story arcs and relationship dynamics with one another. Every character interacts with another differently. It’s also a weird show for the sake of being weird, and much of the time, that’s okay! You can still be a layered show, but also just have an oddball character for the sake of it tying in with some of the themes sewn together throughout the plot. The action when it happens is flashy and fun, but it’s never the most impressive part of the show. What’s fun is watching Bee and Puppycat take on multiple odd jobs on surreal and weird planets that feel reminiscent of stuff like Super Mario Galaxy and seeing how they unfold into the story and connect the main plot with the overarching narrative. It’s you finding out who exactly Puppycat really is, the drama between the humans, Bee and her relationship with her father, and to whom these giant demonic hands that are chasing after Puppycat are attached. 

On the animation front, the show looks like Science Saru made a show that stuck to a more American-made mindset. Personally, Bee and Puppycat feel much more like a vibrant Science Saru show than this year’s Yurei Deco, and that’s saying something. With its combination of soft-looking humans, the muted and mostly pink and purplish-hued color palette, and the sporadic energetic movements of the characters, it doesn’t move or flow like a normal US-made cartoon. Maybe it’s because of the art direction or the studio that produced this show, OLM inc, but it has more of an anime sensibility to it as well. It’s an odd mix of western and eastern animation philosophies that match up in this oddly satisfying way. Then again, with the shows that OLM have had a hand in producing, weird and odd are not too far out of their wheelhouse. The voice cast is great, but once again, the fact they all softly speak their lines shows a real commitment to the calming tone of the overall show. It must have been a hassle to keep all emotions and line reading on one level. You would think this would get grating, but you get used to it, and it makes the comedy land better. The cast is small, but it has a ton of well-known names including Allyn Rachel, the vocaloid system Oliver, Diana Garnet, Malle Flannigan, Natasha Alegri, Emilia Sheldon, Terri Hawks, Kent Osborne, Ashly Burch, Alexander James Rodriguez, Kumail Najiani, Arin Hanson, Doug Smith, Shannon McCormick, Natalie Lynn, Stephen Root, Eric Bauza, Donna Jay Fulks, Jennifer Tilly, Steve Blum, Cynthia McWilliams, Freddie Wong, Jason Greene, and Robbie Daymond. The calm relaxing beats are provided by composer Will Wiesenfeld. They bring a soothing and pleasant vibe to everything, and it’s amusing how it never becomes unpleasant or intense when the characters are in trouble. 

Bee and Puppycat is an out-of-this-world ethereal journey in animation. It has its moments where it can be a touch clunky and it’s pretty obvious that there is either a new season planned or a batch of episodes that have yet to be released due to its ending, but if you are looking for another “new” show to sink your teeth into with the symbolism and relaxing atmosphere, then you will definitely love this show. There is some confusion about if this new show is actually just season 2, but it’s mostly an Evil Dead 2 or a Desperado situation. It’s partly a reboot of the first series of shorts and a sequel series, but all told as if it was made for a first-time audience. Bee and Puppycat is great, and you all should definitely give it a watch if you are looking for new non-returning shows to put on your Netflix playlist. Now then, next time, we will be talking about a rather exciting and technologically driven action romp that you will have to wait and see for yourself. 

Rating: Essential

The Other Side of Animation 271: Lost Ollie Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keep the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

As you can tell with The Other Side of Animation, we don’t really talk about live-action films that cross over into the world of animation. The closest we have talked about it is with Cool World, and the only other contender to talk about in this category is Who Framed Roger Rabbit. We don’t get many of these projects because making them work is a challenge and a half. Not only do you need to worry about how the animation looks, but you have to make it match up and feel composited on the live-action footage. That takes way too much time and money that you know studios will want to not invest into that much time and effort unless it’s a well-known director. Not that it never happens anymore, but it’s very rare. When it does happen, it’s worth checking out, and when they are able to deliver on both the impressive technology with a good story, then you know you are in for something truly special. This is where this new limited series by Shannon Tindle comes into play with Lost Ollie on Netflix. 

Created by Shannon Tindle and each of the four episodes directed by the incredible Peter Ramsey, this is based on the book called Ollie’s Odyssey by William Joyce. We follow a small stitched-together bunny doll named Ollie, voiced by Johnathon Groff. He was the toy that belonged to a small boy named Billy, played by Kesler Talbot. He winds up inside a small vintage antique store. He is curious as to why he is no longer with his kid, and plans to escape. While there, he meets an old clown toy named Zozo, voiced by Tim Blake Nelson. The two of them decide to leave the store together and also meet up with a teddy bear that knows Zozo named Rosy, voiced by Mary J Blige. Along the journey they will discover more about what has happened with Ollie and his past with his human owner, and discover what exactly happened with the humans that Ollie knew. 

So, what kind of level of interaction are we looking at here between the toys and the live-action humans? Shockingly, both humans and toys are kept separate for the majority of the time. You see some interactions with Ollie and Billy’s family, but most of the time it’s either the toys on their adventure to find Billy, or dealing with what the humans are going through. There are a few times where it focuses on Billy, his family, and Ollie, but outside of a few areas where the three toys are with humans, like at the hospital, it’s two parallel stories. The human side is more about a very terrible thing Billy and his parents are dealing with, while Ollie is doing his best to remember the locations on the map he stitched together from memories with Billy and his family. It’s a very interesting approach because it lets the toys be their own living characters, while also slowly weaving the story’s emotional beats into the narrative as they intertwine with one another. At the end of the day, the story tackles themes of family, dealing with loss, and how grief can affect you. The story does a fairly solid job showing how people deal with loss, and how it can shape people for better and for worse. The limited series tend to weave in small details on where you can pick up on the intentions and mindset of the characters as you traverse your way through the four episodes. Things take a real sudden shift in tone by the end of the second episode, but by that point, the third episode explains the dynamic between certain characters and what drives them. It can get dark, but if you have seen films like A Monster Calls, then you will feel right at home with how the story unfolds. There is a real humanity to everything, and it makes for a somber, but powerful experience as we follow the journey of both the toys and the humans. 

Now, animation-wise, the toys look great. They follow the rules of their own design of how they maneuver around the world. Sometimes studios aren’t allowed the time or the talent to take the extra step to make the characters all move distinct and different from one another, and it results in everyone feeling the same. Ollie feels different from Zozo, and Zozo feels different from Rosy. Not once was it ever distracting or I felt pulled out of their world or watching their story unfold from their perspective. There is a great sequence on a train that really brings the best out of the voice actors and the animation. It doesn’t hurt that the actors attached to the toys are also great. Tim Blake Nelson is fantastic as Zozo, Jonathan Groff brings a southern innocence to Ollie, and Mary J Blige has this stoic but vulnerable side to Rosy. The humans are also strong with Kesler Talbot being a good child actor and able to bring the somber and anger to certain points. Gina Rodriguez and Jake Johnson are great as the parents to Billy. Now, the southern accent can almost teeter on being a touch much, but it never got to the point where it sounded like a parody of a joke of what a southern accent sounds like. The other actors are fine, and the only real individual I was distracted by was the bully who is just a bit too cartoonishly mean. I wish there was some kind of hint of why he was like that to Billy, but sometimes, we don’t get those answers and some people just have a heart full of hate. 

While it maybe could have used one more episode to help pace out the story a bit and expand a little more on the characters, and how sometimes the southern accent could almost veer into being a little corny sounding, Lost Ollie is a powerhouse journey of the themes of love, grief, dealing with loss, and how you use said emotional baggage to shape your own person. Some may say this limited series is corny, but there is a lot of passion and love put into the character beats, and if you all love stuff like A Monster Calls, then this is an ideal limited series to check out. I can’t wait to see what Shannon Tindle, Peter Ramsey, and this talented crew of writers do next, and you should absolutely check this show out. Hopefully, they can also put this on a nice Blu-ray with some behind-the-scenes features of how they made the animation work as well as it does. Now then, we must journey to Japan for this next review, but you will see what the review is next time!




Rating: Go see it!

The Other Side of Animation 268: Super Giant Robot Brothers Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keep the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

Animation is an ever-evolving medium that we will see growing and changing with how we see artists and tech individuals crafting more experiences. We have definitely seen where some roads to the evolution of animation have taken us from CGI art directions now more able to match the stylish concept art, to that upcoming Fox animated comedy Krapolis for some reason wanting to implement blockchain and NFT nonsense. We have seen animated films use motion capture technology, lower framerates, more stylish visuals, and a mix of both CGI and 2D in varying ways. It’s very cool to be in such a world right now, where we can try something out and see how it works. Maybe it results in something that’s admirable but messy, or something that may have a few clunky aspects but is overall executed well. Who knows, we are seeing anime these days use CGI and motion capture to wonderful success with Beastars, so maybe we can see something like that used for American animation. Oh wait, we have! This is where we are with today’s review, Super Giant Robot Brothers. 




Created by Victor Maldonado and Alfredo Torres, the series is directed by Mark Andrews and is produced by Reel FX Animation. The story revolves around two giant robots named Shiny, voiced by Eric Lopez, and Thunder, voiced by Chris Diamantopoulos, who are made to protect the day from evil kaiju invasions from an unknown alien force that wants to destroy the world. Can our two giant robot brothers be super, and protect the day along with the help of the child science prodigy Alex Rose, voiced by Marisa Davila? What are the origins of these aliens? What do the aliens want? What about the time travel one of the robots went through at the beginning of the show? 




So, what makes this show’s animation style distinct? Essentially, they used motion-capture, but instead of doing the motion-capture data stuff first, and then crafting the models for the motion-capture data, they made assets and models that will be used in the motion-capture process, and they made a production pipeline where the animation is happening in real-time. It’s a little complicated, but luckily, if you go to the Unreal Engine YouTube page, they have a video talking about the process of making Super Giant Robot Brothers. It’s very impressive how they were able to make this work. Of course, they have animators go through the data and give it all of those fancy and polished touches that you expect, since, well, we really don’t need another Ex-Arm situation with motion-capture and animation. Luckily, with what we do have, you can describe the animation as a mix or in the same vein of stuff like City of Ghosts, The Willoughbys, and that upcoming DC-animated DTV film that uses a more stylized CGI look. Despite a few moments where you can tell the motion-capture is there, the show does a great job hiding that aspect. The characters are extremely expressive and their posing gives off so much personality. You got the more child-like movements and expressions, from Shiny to Thunder’s more stoic, robotic, and calculated serious-faced mannerisms. The action also doesn’t get kneecapped by the motion-capture process. It’s still big, explosive, fast-paced, and a thrill to watch. The posing and lower framerate give the character’s movements and motions more of a punch, and you can tell exactly what kind of characters they are by said poses and movements.  Overall, it’s very impressive that this was done on Unreal Engine and a show that is able to use a video game engine. In addition, it doesn’t look like a weird clunky oversea’s animated film or those Unreal Engine demos, where they take a cartoony world and place it in the hyper-realism of Unreal Engine. 



So, is this show all just fancy and impressive motion-capture and action-packed CGI visuals? Of course not! It would be boring if this show was just flashy visuals. There is a story about how our round robot Shiny is teleported into the future and encounters his brother Thunder. The two of them bonding and working with one another is one of the emotional cores of the show, alongside Alex Rose’s journey of finding out what exactly happened to her parents that went through the same portal that Shiny went through. It’s a show that’s mostly about family, bonding, and trust with one another. It’s a show that is basically aimed at a pseudo-young audience, but the writing has enough snap to its dialogue between Shiny and Thunder that older audience members in the teen and adult area will have fun with the action and dialogue. It does balance out its comedy and drama fairly well, as the villains are straightforward, but fun to hear their banter. The voice cast is also solid with the already mentioned Eric Lopez, Chris Diamantopolous, and Marisa Davila, but we also have Delbert Hunt, Ren Hanami, Tiana Camacho, and Tommy Bello Rivas. The opening theme song is great, and it’s a shame they cut it short after the first episode. Theme songs seem to be disappearing all of the time with modern TV, and it would be a real shame for that to be a thing that keeps happening. You need theme songs to hype people up for your show, especially action shows. 

While it’s straightforward and aimed at a pseudo-younger audience, when has that ever actually stopped a show or a film from being good? Some of the most fun things are happening within the animation scene, and despite so much that is going on with Netflix and their situation with the animation industry, the people working in those industries are still going to put out some great stuff. This year alone has given us some really fun series and films, and Super Giant Robot Brothers is one of those. You will definitely feel the power of the Super Giant Robot Brothers, and if you love giant robot stuff whether they be video games, shows, and films, then you should give this show a watch. It’s a fun action-packed comedic romp that is a delight to sit through. Now then, how about we talk about that film that is simply put, one of the best films of 2022? You will have to wait and see what that is! 

Rating: Go See It!

The Other Side of Animation 264: The Sea Beast Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keep the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

Heads up: I was able to watch this film via a screener sent to me from Netflix. I received no other form of monetization other than the screener. Thank you Netflix for this opportunity.

With the recent chaos going on at Netflix, it does seem like it’s the very end of an era. You would walk in, and they said you could make something that a normal studio wouldn’t bother making, due to how most studios function. While there is still going to be some creative animated fare in production that will get finished and made, that means we have to, as lovers of animation, support these projects when they come out. Being a fan and supporter of the hard-working teams that make these projects means you have to actually watch them on the service they are put on or when they are in a theater in your area that’s playing it. Be loud, be supportive, and make sure word gets around when these films or shows come out. Sadly, due to the fact most streaming services, especially Netflix won’t put the money down for a marketing team, they are solely relying on word of mouth, and that’s not always a winning solution. It usually results in amazing shows and films getting thrown under the bus. For example, if you have yet to add the amazing The Sea Beast to your watch list, then you need to this instant.

This film is directed by Chris Williams, written by Chris Williams and Nell Benjamin, with animation being produced by Sony Pictures Imageworks. We follow a sea-faring monster hunter named Jacob Holland, voiced by Karl Urban. He is a crew member among a ship run by Captain Crow, voiced by Jared Harris. They go on adventures looking for a specific beast to strike down. All of this is happening while the royalty of this world is trying to outdo the small monster hunter ships with big bombastic navy ships. One day though, after taking down another monster, Jacob goes into town and encounters a young girl named Maisie Brumble, voiced by Zaris-Angel Harter. She tries to convince Jacob to let her on the ship and he tries to be a reasonable individual declining her offer to join the crew. Now, granted that should stop the story right then and there, but Maisie ends up sneaking onto the ship and joins the crew anyway. After another attempted takedown of a known beast, Jacob and Maisie get separated and presumed dead by Captain Crow, when in reality, Jacob and Maisie end up washed upon a shore of an island where the famed beast is located. Can Jacob team up with Maisie and get back to land? What will happen with their relationship with the beasts, and what mysteries and secrets will they unravel as they trek their way across the sea? 


First off, it’s really cool that we are getting this action adventure film in a time where there are more action-oriented animated films coming out. Theatrical animated films tend to fall under the comedy genre because they have wider audiences, but with there being a recent push for more variety is refreshing. Not that we haven’t had any straight-up action adventure films of recent years, but they still tended to lean into the comedy aspects. With this film, it gives you the tone right off the bat with this world being framed as imposing, threatening, and dangerous while traversing the high seas. The way this film shows off the scale of the monsters as they attack the ships, and how truly small the humans are makes you feel like you are living in a world filled with giants. The entire film does a great job balancing out the action and the story, so it doesn’t feel like one of those action-adventure films where the action was given priority and the story suffered, or vice versa. It’s always a tricky balance. There were plenty of big action set pieces between the ships, the monsters, and because it is a film about giant monsters, there is a sequence where two giant beasts combat one another. It’s all set up to be intensely thrilling and satisfying to watch. Animation is such an amazing medium for storytelling, and the way they execute these battle scenes is like a work of wonder with how fun they are. 




Like I said though, this is a film that found the perfect balance between action and story, and that means the story itself is just as good as the action beats. What feels so refreshing about this film’s plot is how, while it does revolve around two polar-opposite individuals with Jacob being in the anti-sea monster side of the equation and Maisie the more pro-monster, they give enough time for the typical story beats you see with these stories. They are given the time they need, and the execution feels precise and effective. You end up having some of the most complex characters of any animated feature from 2022. You understand why Jacob would be against the sea beasts due to his past, and how Maisie’s more optimistic and hopeful outlook on life and the sea beasts would shine a different perspective on the situation, with the dynamic between the beasts and the humans. It’s also a film that is absolutely willing to go to more mature spaces. Yes, the monsters have more cartoony looks to them compared to the humans, but don’t expect the story to stay simple. It’s a film that tackles themes of fear-mongering, it’s anti-war, extremely critical of the royalty that runs this world’s political system, and illustrates how history can be told and structured to fit a certain narrative. It’s surprising, but also refreshing how animated films are willing to talk about issues that are more than what most people assume every single animated film is about. It’s all in the execution, and the fact this film is taking itself as seriously as it needs to be is refreshing, especially when some entertainment experiences that are absolutely silly are taken seriously and conversely, experiences that are dark are trying to play as silly. While there are moments of humor, and much of the time the monsters have squishy-looking designs, it never feels out of place when the film has to move back to the the more serious moments. For a film that has all of this going on, it never felt like there were parts where someone put in a note to be more modern or try to appeal to younger kids. Like, you already have pirates, ships, and giant monsters, what else do you need?! Giving something the audience wants means playing your premise straight with no attempts to try and modernize or cater to more modern kids. It’s a fantastical setting. We aren’t at a time where we need to try and be like the next hot animated fare. It’s also nice to see an animated film that actually is two hours long. Most animated films these days are only at 100 or so minutes and there has been this eerie sense of “either this needed to be paced better or they needed more time to expand upon the story, the world, or the characters”. Thankfully, while the runtime is long for an animated film, it’s paced to where it doesn’t quite feel like it, and even when you do get a sense of the film’s length, it’s nice to see the film breathe so it doesn’t feel like it’s trying to get to each set piece as quickly as possible. 




Animation-wise, this is an incredible looking film. The humans have distinct visual designs that aren’t trying to ape off of a similar style or go the more safe typical CGI route with humans that look like Pixar or Disney CGI characters, but look a touch off from those. The humans in this film are stylized, and while having some exaggerated design choices, they mesh well with the cartoonier monster designs. Even though this is Sony Pictures Imageworks, it plays against the usual type of animated films that are under their umbrella. They have a similar design direction that you would see in old pirate or sailing stories. Yes, it is thrilling to get more animated films that take inspiration from Spider-Verse, but The Sea Beast handles its visuals well, and we need animated films to tell compelling stories while having incredible details in their animation. The camera swings and moves around the beasts to really emphasize their size and they have a “pseudo How to Train Your Dragon” feel to their movements and mannerisms. Their bright colors contrasting with the humans and world’s more realistic and drab colors is eye-catching. One of the best details from the art direction is how the main town and kingdom that the film’s entire world is built around looks like the compass on an old map. You can see the design when you watch the trailers or when the ship arrives in port. Voicecast-wise, there is a fantastic lineup of actors who bring some delightful performances to the journey throughout the seven seas. Even though most know Karl Urban for his current role in Amazon’s The Boys, he brings a charming seriousness to Jacob, and Zaris Angel-Hator delivers a performance making Maisie one of the best child protagonists of the year. Jared Harris is great as Captain Crow. Some of the other big names include Marianne Jean-Baptise, Dan Stevens, Helen Sandler, Xana Tang, and Kathy Burke. The music by Mark Mancina reunites Chris and Mark from their time working on Moana. It’s epic, adventurous in tone, and of course, being sailors in this sea-faring flick, there is a sea shanty that you can bet a gold doubloon on that the fandoms revolving around sea shanties will be all over the one in this film. 




The fact of the matter is that The Sea Beast is an incredible adventure. A rip-roaring sea-faring adventure filled with the heart as big as the film’s titular beasts for everyone big and small. It’s hands down, one of the best films of the year and one of the best films to premiere on the streaming service. There is a real shame that this didn’t get a wide theatrical release because this film was made for an Imax screen. This is the power of how services like Netflix worked for letting creators make the films they want, but then just greenlight these projects for the sake of content and give them no real support. Everyone should give this film a watch when it hits the streamer. Hopefully, Chris Williams is able to make more compelling flicks like this, because if he does, I will be there on day one no matter where he ends up making a film. Now then, next time, we will be talking about a new Japanese feature hitting English shores with The Deer King!




Rating: Essential

The Other Side of Animation 258 – Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keep the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

Heads up: I was able to watch this film via a screener sent to me from Netflix. I received no other form of monetization other than the screener. Thank you Netflix for this opportunity.



Childlike memories are unreliable, fuzzy, and nostalgic in a lot of ways. I’m sure most people tend to look back on their childhood from time to time. Maybe to remember their time as a child with their families, maybe to look back at what that time period was like in terms of politics, social climate, and you get the idea. Sometimes, we look back in the past to see where we were back then, or maybe we see where we are now compared to back then. Living through historic events and trends can really shape what you do and how you see the world around you. It’s very difficult to capture that feeling of nostalgia and fondly look back at memories of your childhood on film, because you either look navel-gazing, pretentious, or like an old man yelling at clouds. You have to bring earnest energy into the story or the overall experience, and some directors are able to make that work to their advantage, like Cameron Crowe before his career ended and today’s director, Richard Linklater with his new film, Apollo 10 ½: A Space Age Childhood


Directed and written by Richard Linklater, we follow the childhood of Stanley, voiced/played by Milo Coy. The narrator of Stanley’s story is, of course, an adult Stanley, who we never see, but is voiced by Jack Black. The story revolves around adult Stanley recalling his childhood during the big space race/ space-age craze time period of the 1960s when Apollo 11 landed on the moon. The one twist is that adult Stanley adds a twist to the story of kid Stanley getting chosen by two NASA Officials played/voiced by Glen Powell and Zachary Levi to help NASA with going to the moon. 

So, if you are curious about what kind of story is being told here, it’s less a major three-act story where there is a story about NASA hiring a kid to go into space. It’s more about the narrator remembering the time period and his childhood. It’s a more grounded story, but has that small bit of whimsy of Stanley training to go into space. The overall story covers multiple aspects of the time period, including politics, war, a small splash of the racial inequality of the time, pop culture, what the film industry was like, how families around NASA worked, food, and you get the idea. It’s all about capturing that time period through a nostalgic lens. As mentioned above, you have to be so careful, because it can come off either sappy or extremely cynical in an entirely different way. No one wants to see a film about an old man saying “life was good in my day”. The film even points out elements like how kids were punished back then, as more of a low point than anything else. It was able to capture the childlike viewpoint and mindset, and how everything going on was fed through the lens of a kid going through the times. I’m sure most viewers will be able to spot themselves or their families or the parents of your family knowing what it was like back then. Apollo 10 ½: A Space Age Childhood overall has a charm that you can’t find in many films with this type of story set-up. It makes you remember when the big new things in pop culture were the colored TV, Baskin Robbins having 31 flavors, syndicated television, and you get the idea. It has its adult moments, but it has one graphic moment and very little swearing. It has adult themes and elements, but it doesn’t indulge in what most people think of when the term “adult animation” pops up. 

Linklater has, for the third time, returned to rotoscope animation, and it’s definitely his most polished take on the animation art form. It’s not rough like Waking Life or as surreal and unusual as A Scanner Darkly. They said the inspiration for the art style is similar to what animated shows were like back when Saturday morning cartoons were like that, and while it’s more similar to the color palette of that time period, the animation does look great. The fact we are getting more films like this, including 2017’s Loving Vincent, is nice to see. Animation is such a vibrant medium, that you must be a real uneducated tool to think animation is just for kids. It has its moments of clunkiness, but rotoscope animation is going to feel like that, but that’s why you have animators and hardworking VFX people to make it look as good as possible. The voice cast or in this case, traced-over actors are fantastic with Glen Powell and Zachary Levi as the two NASA agents, Jack Black bringing a loving warmth to the narration of the entire film, and the other cast including Milo Coy, Bill Wise, Lee Eddy, Josh Wiggins, Natalie L’Amoreaux, Jessica Brynn Cohen, Sam Chipman, and Danielle Guilbot all doing a great job to make you feel like a part of this time period. Normally, there is a sentence or two here talking about the composer, but the composer is really the soundtrack that looms over this film’s entire runtime that is full of a lot of great old tunes and rock-and-roll that perfectly fit the time period.  

The only real criticism this critic could find is that there could have been a bit more time put into the kid’s fantasy of getting hired by Nasa. It’s the opening scene and the instigator of what can be charitably called the third act. Again, it’s more of a time “capsule retelling” of the period, and that stuff is great, but when the film’s trailer paints it more about the space mission, it’s mismarketed, and your tolerance for nostalgic look-back at time period films will depend on how you, the viewer, will tolerate how much of the first and second act is all about it. 

This film is quite the nostalgic experience. It’s less, ‘Nasa sends a boy to space’, and more about being a kid during the big space race and space-age boom in Houston. It’s a fantastic film, but I can understand that some viewers may see the marketing of Nasa sending a literal kid to space instead of the more metaphorical and symbolic angle it goes for. It’s on Netflix, and if you love yourself some Richard Linklater charm and some distinct and unique animated offerings that show animation is more than “just for kids”, then definitely give this film a watch. Next time, we will be talking about Netflix’s other big April tentpole animated offering. 

Rating: Go See It!

The Other Side of Animation 255: Human Resources Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keep the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

Heads up: I was able to watch this film via a screener sent to me from Netflix. I received no other form of monetization other than the screener. Thank you Netflix for this opportunity.

Out of all of the shows that get people hot and bothered on Netflix, Big Mouth gets people the most bothered. The iconic adult comedy that revolves around the life of a bunch of kids going through the disastrous and horrifying time of puberty with the help of monsters and creatures representing different sides of the human condition has split viewers down the middle. Some love this raunchy comedy for what it’s tackling with puberty, sex, gender identity, and relationships. On the other hand, many do not care for it due to how it’s yet another crass raunchy animated comedy that supposedly skates by with an artificial approach to said topics mentioned in the previous sentence. It doesn’t help that other shows got canceled while Big Mouth was able to fester. Luckily, shows like Tuca and Bertie were able to find new life on other services, but you get the idea. People who hate adult animation and comedies tend to point to this one being the worst of them all as it lingers grossly on the service. And now Nick Kroll and his creative team have a spin-off show that focuses on the monsters at hand. Now then, let’s make a trip to the third floor to Human Resources

This new show was created by  Nick Kroll, Andrew Goldberg, Kelly Galuska, Mark Levin, and Jennifer Flackett. This takes place in the world of the creatures that inhabited Big Mouth. We follow a group of different creatures including love bugs, anxiety mosquitos, logic rocks, hormone monsters, depression kitties, addiction angels, and you get the idea. We follow them through their daily lives as they help deal with the problems, minute and personal. 

So, with this being a spin-off to Big Mouth, expect a lot of the same elements that defined the iconic yet polarizing series. Comedy-wise, expect this to be fairly raunchy with so many sex jokes, swearing, and essentially, a small army worth of innuendos and visual gags. There will be nudity and some fairly graphical moments with violence and sex, but at this point with adult animated comedies on the streaming service, you should expect there to be no real limitations. As we have seen with shows like The Prince or HOOPS, being crass, shocking, offensive, and or in bad taste is not enough to make shows good, due to how you need something else to balance out the crass, cynical, and or mean-spirited nature of the art you are offering to viewers. Like how Big Mouth has a flawed if not admirable path of talking about the ugly side of puberty and coming of age with its kid characters becoming teens, Human Resources focuses more on the adult side of the lifespan. Granted, that sounds weird since this show is reliant on you loving the monsters and creatures that helped out the humans in the original show. 

Luckily, there is substance to this show. We see themes and storylines dealing with friendships, workplace situations, trust, dealing with loss and grief, toxic traits, the unpredictable reasons behind being in love, the battle between love and logical thinking, self-love, complicated relationships, sex, and you get the idea. The show does give a lot of characters time to bounce off of one another, and while your tolerance for these characters will make this series enjoyable, there are a few likable characters including Randall Park as Peter the logic rock. Everyone does a good job working off of one another, and while the crass humor is, say it with this critic now, the ride-or-die element of your tolerance for the story and how it all unfolds, there are a few really solid jokes and gags. 

Animation-wise, this show has the common adult-animated comedy visual look caused by problems that originate with bad production cycles made by giant studios and companies not giving the teams making these shows the time they need. As usual, people in the animation industry need new deals, so make sure you show support with stuff like #NewDeal4Animation, #StoryCraftUnite, and #EqualPay4EqualPaint. While it may not have the most appealing designs, there are a few designs that are fun to look at. I love the logic rocks and the need demons the most. It also seems like some moments in the show were able to breathe a little more and have a more fluid feel.  The voice cast is also pretty good with a great cast of comedic and character actors. You have Aidy Bryant, Nick Kroll, Maya Rudolph, David Thewlis, Keke Palmer, Pamela Adlon, Randall Park, Ali Wong, Thandie Newton, Bobby Cannavale, Jemaine Clement, Maria Bamford, Rosie Perez, Henry Winkler, and even guest appearances from Hugh Jackman, Helen Mirin, Lupita Nyong’o, and Janelle Monae to name a majority of a really stacked cast. 

Now, in terms of criticisms, with most comedies, the humor is hit-and-miss, and, well, that’s no different here. A lot of the humor can be a touch much. It has musical moments, but sometimes it can feel too chaotic onscreen all at once.  Some of the comedy even goes down to just yelling, and it’s not fun to watch when everything is going bananas on screen. It also has issues from time to time of balancing out the crass comedy and its more sincere moments. Sometimes the morals hit, and sometimes the comedic punchline or gross-out joke tends to take away the emotional punch. Yes, these characters can be deplorable and gross, but shows like this need to be careful with wanting to have their cake and eat it too. 

While your mileage will very much vary with this spin-off, Human Resources offers a more human experience to the adult animation landscape. If you like Big Mouth, but more for the times it hits more human themes and the creatures involved, then you will probably enjoy this show. If not, well, you can go watch something like Undone on Amazon Prime or Primal on HBO Max for your adult animated needs. Now then, next time, we will be taking a good look at Pixar’s Turning Red

Rating: Go See It! 

The Other Side of Animation 254: Child of Kamiari Month

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keeps the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

With the Oscars once again dismissing and ignoring the Japanese animation side of things, stagnating as usual with what they actually nominate over what they should be nominating for awards, let’s keep reminding ourselves that not getting nominated doesn’t mean the film in question isn’t good. Who’s favorite film is actually ever in the Best Picture category? Anyway, just because the award shows announce their nominees, doesn’t mean films stop getting made. More movies are going to come out and they will continue to be interesting, good, bad or everything in-between, no matter the awards they are or aren’t given. So, let’s get down to it with one of the first animated films of the year with Child of Kamiari Month

This film was directed by Takana Shirai, written by Ryuta Miyake, Tetsuro Takita, Toshinari Shinoe, and was produced by Liden Films. The story revolves around a tongue girl named Kanna Hayama, dubbed by Mia Sinclair Jenness. Her life has been upended due to the death of her mother and she has lost her passion for running. That’s a touch unfortunate because she is also participating in her school’s marathon with her supportive dad being there. Sadly, due to the emotional baggage that she has been carrying, she doesn’t quite do well at the marathon, and runs away before her father can help comfort her. She runs to a shrine that she walked past with her friend the other day, and while there, her mother’s keepsake starts to activate. Time slows down around her and she realizes that something is up. Kanna can see the spirits that inhabit the shrines now! She encounters a talking bunny spirit named Shiro, dubbed by Luci Christian, who comes just in time to help her with an encounter with an oni boy named Yasha, dubbed by Mark Allen Jr. After the encounter, Shiro tells Kanna that she must go on this journey across Japan and gather the offerings from different spirits for Kamiari Month, a mystical holiday that is a celebration of the gods and spirits. Reluctantly, Kanna accepts the quest to traverse all over Japan to get all of the different gifts and complete the run. 

So, a recurring theme seen in so many foreign animated films that have been covered in multiple reviews and brought over to the states has been the main character going through some kind of coming-of-age story of getting over their grief or dealing with the loss of a loved one. It’s not an original concept, but they execute it well, with a much smaller-scale story about Kanna dealing with the loss of her mom and the growing depression and bitterness that has been caged up inside of her since that incident. The other side character that starts out as a rival to Kanna, the oni boy Yasha, has his own arc and reasons for wanting to do the run for Kamiari Month to regain the honor of his family that was dragged through the mud and banished from the heavens above. It’s a quieter experience as a couple of the montage sequences are just visuals set to music. The overall story might have some wonky and familiar elements, but it’s a good reminder, as usual, that not every film needs to be a groundbreaking mind-blowing experience. Sometimes, you just need to dial back your expectations 

The animation is pretty solid. It’s not super-flashy, and personally, when you are coming out after Belle, Josee The Tiger and The Fish, and Words that Bubble Up Like Soda Pop, it doesn’t quite compare to those, and not every film needs to, but don’t expect this to be on the same level as those films or upcoming films like Bubble and Drift Away. It does have some nice flourishes like when they encounter a giant dragon god, and when the film wants to have some distinct visual moments, it does deliver on those aspects with some waterloo flourishes that have elements of those Japanese ink paintings. The voice cast is also pretty rock solid with Mia Sinclair Jenness, Mark Allen Jr., Luci Christian, Kirk Thorton, Keith Silverstein, and Michael Sorich all bringing their usual top-level talent. 

In terms of criticisms, the film takes a lot of time to talk and explain everything about Kamiari Month. It’s not well-paced, because instead of spreading out everything throughout the runtime, they upload a ton of exposition about the lore and how everything works, and it becomes a bit much. Once you get past the film’s first 15 or so minutes, it ends up flowing much better, but you have to be careful about doing that story build-up upfront. It’s because most will be ready to switch to watching something else if the story is not paced well. It would be better if they were able to spread everything else around the run across Japan as they were doing it instead of wasting so much time in one spot to save money and time on new environments. 

While not perfect, and Netflix once again not promoting this film that they spent money on outside of a single trailer, Child of Kamiari Month is a solid spiritual experience of getting over loss and becoming spiritually stronger. Personally, Sing a Bit of Harmony is the better of the two Japanese animated films released this year so far. Luckily, it was able to get some attention on Netflix and on the web before it got buried or overlooked by Studio Wit’s upcoming animated feature Bubble that’s coming out on Netflix in April. If you need something to watch and to get your anime fill that’s not a weekly TV series, then definitely give this show a watch. Next time, we will be talking about a new spin-off series based on one of Netflix’s most controversial and popular series.

Thanks for reading the review! I hope you all enjoyed reading it! If you would like to support my work, make sure to share it out, and if you want to become a Patreon supporter, then you can go to patreon.com/camseyeview. I will see you all next time!

Rating: Go See It!

The Other Side of Animation 253: The Cuphead Show Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keeps the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

Heads up: I was able to watch this film via a screener sent to me from Netflix. I got no other form of monetization other than the screener. Thank you Netflix for this opportunity.

Despite the loaded and complicated history of the rubber hose animation aesthetic, the visual look has always been a favorite among fans of art and animation. When animation visual styles go through trends, there is always this yearning for an older visual look, and while I think some of the yearnings for more nostalgic-fueled visuals can sometimes lean into some very toxic attitudes, you can see, on a visual level, why people would want to see creators and studios bring back a classic look to new shows. Of course, when you tackle something with rubber hose animation, it’s the art style you have to be the most careful with, due to how some of the design decisions made during the early days of animation have some racist undertones. Luckily, with Studio MDHR and their hit game Cuphead, they were able to translate the iconic visual style into one of the most graphically impressive experiences of the previous console generation. Of course, when a game like this gets as big as it does, then you know a show is not too far behind. Well, let’s get started then! 

Animated by Lighthouse Studios, executive produced by Chad and Jared Moldenhauer (the two who created the game), and it’s developed by Dave Wasson for Netflix. The two different directors involved for this first batch of episodes are Adam Paloian and Clay Morrow. The story follows the wacky and shenanigan-filled adventures of Cuphead and Mugman, voiced by Tru Valentino and Frank Todaro. They go all around the Inkwell Isle encountering the individuals that live there and of course avoiding the evil grasp of The Devil, voiced by Luke Millington-Drake. Along the way, they interact with their elderly caretaker Elder Kettle,  voiced by Joe Hanna, the lovely Miss Chalice, voiced by Grey Griffin, and you get the idea. 

So, while there was a “plot” in the original game, it was very straightforward. The world was vast and full of a lot of interesting-looking characters. The one thing the game was not, was story-focused. Since that is the case, how on earth do you turn this show into a TV series?  With how there wasn’t too much lore and world-building put into the main game, it wouldn’t make sense to make it more story-driven, so instead of going the route of some story-driven shows, they went the route of the more recent Animaniacs and Looney Tunes direction, making more episodic shenanigan-filled adventures. Some episodes have some pseudo-ongoing story beats, but they are usually wrapped up within the second part, and the first batch of episodes ends with a cliffhanger, so it will be interesting to see where they take the rest of the episodes. The main focus for the episodes is putting Cuphead and Mugman in a situation and the hijinks ensue. They feel very old school with how they set up stories and jokes, but they bring a more modern-day sentimentality to the overall vibe and humor, so it never feels dated or going fully against the time period the show’s animation style is from. A lot of the jokes and set-ups are delightfully charming, and that’s because they were able to give the characters more concrete personalities for our heroes to work off of. Not that the characters didn’t already have them in the game, but they were mostly told through one line of dialogue or through their animation via their movements. Some of the stories have the typical “oh, this was a big misunderstanding” plot set-up or “I’m brave because I got this special item that’s not actually special, but it makes me feel brave”, but the dialogue and the lines they offer are what help elevate it to be more than just shorts going through the motions. With all that said, the character they do give these individuals is delightful, and The Devil might be my favorite character alongside his grunt and King Dice. 

Now then, with the animation, there has been a controversy about how the animation itself is not purely or strickly like the video game. Listen, you can dislike how polished the linework is for the show’s visuals, but the fact of the matter is that doing super old-school 2D animation is costly and time-consuming, and knowing the current landscape of animation production, they were never going to be able to do pure 2D visuals like the old-school days. Heck, the developers of the game revealed they had to remortgage their home to make the game, due to how costly it was to make said game with super slick 2D animation. With what the studio had with whatever production schedule they were given, The Cuphead Show looks really good. It might use a mix of 2D and maybe some animation rigging, but the fact that the visuals look as good as they do and how they were pretty much able to copy and keep the game’s visuals the same is impressive. They even use some filter or graphical techniques to give off the impression of the multi-layer camera effects the older Disney films had. It’s a visually impressive show that stands out from other animated offerings on Netflix. The voice cast is also pretty great, with the already mentioned names above with Tru Valentino, Frank Todaro, Joe Hanna, Luke Millington-Drake, Grey Griffin, Wayne Brady, and the rest of the cast is spot-on with the characters they portray. They even have a few musical moments and they are real bangers that bring back the musical styles of the old Betty Boop cartoons. 

Overall, The Cuphead Show succeeds with its adaptation from video game to animated series, and we already know there are going to be 48 episodes, so we are getting more. Now, Netflix, I’m happy this show is a success, but you better pay the teams that made this show the money they are owed, because with the current landscape of the animation industry revealing how much worse people who work in animation are paid compared to live-action is disheartening and maddening. It would be a shame to find out if you all didn’t give this team their due. Anyway, you can enjoy the first “season” on Netflix on the 18th, and if you like old-school cartoony-style shows, then you will love this show. Now then, let’s tackle a film that Netflix barely covered and advertised with Child of Kamiari Month

Thanks for reading the review! I hope you all enjoyed reading it! If you would like to support my work, make sure to share it out, and if you want to become a Patreon supporter, then you can go to patreon.com/camseyeview. I will see you all next time!

Rating: Go See It!

The Other Side of Animation 250: The House Review

(If you like what you see, you can go to camseyeview.biz to see more of my work on video game reviews, editorials, lists, Kickstarters, developer interviews, and review/talk about animated films. If you would like, consider contributing to my Patreon at patreon.com/camseyeview. It would help support my work, and keeps the website up. Thanks for checking out my work, and I hope you like this review!)

It’s 2022, and we are still in January, which is a noted dump month for a bunch of films that eitherHollywood doesn’t mind losing money on, or are hoping that they can offer something to moviegoers who aren’t interested in the award season fodder that gets released. Thankfully, with the advent of streaming and streaming services that are more willing to be experimental and offer distinct experiences, January is no longer the worst month of the year. Granted, bad movies are still going to get dumped into January, and that’s not going to change anytime soon. Luckily, we have something like the incredible anthology film that they originally marketed as a limited series with Netflix’s The House

The three shorts are directed by three sets of directors. The first short, And heard within, a lie is spun, is directed by  Marc James Roels & Emma De Swaef. It’s about a family who lives in a small humble home where the dad is tired of being judged for being poor. One dark night, he meets a client who is willing to offer him and his family a nice fancy house with no real hang-ups. Well, at first. The second short, Then lost is truth that can’t be won, which is directed by Niki Lindroth Von Bahr, it’s about a mouse that is trying to sell a house that he is refurbishing. Nothing is looking great until he catches the attention of a fairly odd couple. The final short, Listen again and seek the sun, is directed by Paloma Baeza, and is about a cat who owns the titular house in a world that has been flooded and is trying to refurbish it while the water is rising and to soon engulf the house. On top of tenants that don’t properly pay, a new arrival to the house sets things up for something life-changing. 

One of the fun aspects of seeing this anthology film is how distinct it is from other horror films. We have seen anthology films in horror and live-action, but when do we ever get horror animated features that aren’t Halloween specials made for families? It’s one of the few examples of animation that is aimed at adults that isn’t hyper-violent. Now, before walking into this film that was for some reason marketed as a limited series, there is something you should know. This is not a traditional horror film with jumpscares or hyper-violence. Some have said that this would be a stop-motion horror film by the ways of what A24 likes to distribute, and, well, that’s not wrong. The horror here does have some genuine scares, but consider this the category of scares that get under your skin and are more metaphorical. The stories deal with obsession, depression, abandonment, gentrification, and other themes that are woven throughout the three stories, and each one is consistently unnerving to sit through. It gets you in the same way the paranoia in John Carpenter’s The Thing or Ari Aster’s Midsommar hits you when you realize something is extremely off about the situations in each of the stories. Why did this family get such a nice house? Who is the odd couple interested in buying the house? What is really going on with the landlord of the house? What mysteries are there in this setting? If that’s the type of horror for you, then this film will absolutely click with you. It can even be somewhat funny and extremely heartwarming at times. It depends on the story you are watching, of course. 

Animation-wise, it’s stop motion! It’s extremely fun and impressive to see studios and teams still making films with an art style that is costly and time-consuming, which is what most studios are allergic to. The first short uses the duo director’s iconic use of felt-like humans with very round heads and tiny faces. Even with such distinct designs, the horror and atmosphere doesn’t feel distracting. The other two use fur and designs that will be familiar to viewers who have seen the stop-motion short The Burden, or if you have seen any Wes Anderson stop-motion films. The voice cast is also rather good with a few big names, but it was never a huge marketing point. You do have Helena  Bonham Carter, Mathew Goode, Paul Kaye, Claudie Blakley, Mia Goth, Mark Heap, Miranda Richardson, Josh McGuire, Stephanie Cole, Jarvis Cocker, Dizzee Rascal, Yvonne Lombard, Sven Wollter, Tommy Hibbits, Ayesha Antoine, Susie Wokoma, and Will Sharpe. The music by Gustavo Santaolalla is delightfully creepy, unsetting, but also ethereal and emotional. He also helped compose the music for The Book of Life, Narcos: Mexico, The Last of Us Part 1 and Part 2, Finch, and Maya and The Three

Despite being a sort of “you have to be in this mood” horror film, and the confusion as to why they marketed this as a limited series rather than a film has never been fully explained, The House is 2022’s first big animated hit. It’s an incredible experience that if you are a fan of animation, you should absolutely check out this film! Granted, this is absolutely not for kids. Not to say they probably couldn’t handle it, but they will either be terrified or really bored. If you like horror films that are more akin to the A24-distributed types, then you will love this film. If you are more akin to the Blumhouse or more mainstream crowd-pleasing horror, then you will also probably like it! There is room for both hyper-violent and jump-scare-driven horror and more methodical horror. At the end of the day, it all comes down with how you execute it. Now then, next time, we will be looking at the best animated film of 2021 with Mamoru Hosoda’s Belle




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Rating: Go See It!